English Language Learners

Learn More About the Hope ELL Program

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English Language Learners (ELL)

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“Teaching and Learning Go Hand in Hand.”

English Language Development (ELD) is a component of a total program designed to serve the needs of ELL. ELD is a specific curriculum that addresses the teaching of the English language according to the level of proficiency of
the ELL student.

All learners acquire English faster and easier if the curriculum they receive and the methodologies utilized to deliver the curriculum are finely tuned to their evolving fluency. The ELD curriculum is essential to the succes of all ELL students and is closely linked to the first goal of bilingual education; English language proficiency.

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Our Mission

Our mission is to increase the level of English proficiency for students whose first language is a language other than English. By doing so, we are increasing the likelihood of academic achievement as well as productivity in the workplace in America.

Student Placement

All students are given a home language survey asking parents to indicate the primary language spoken in the home. If English is indicated, students are assumed to be English proficient. If any language other than English is checked, the students name will be submitted to the Office of Bilingual Education in order to check the status of previous testing. If this office has testing information, they will send it to the school to become a part of the permanent file. All other students will be tested at the school level to determine their English proficiency level.

Program Description

English Language Development (ELD) is a component of a total program designed to serve the needs of ELL. ELD is a specific curriculum that addresses the teaching of the English language according to the level of proficiency of the ELL student. All learners acquire English faster and easier if the curriculum they receive and the methodologies utilized to deliver the curriculum are finely tuned to their evolving fluency. The ELD curriculum is essential to the success of all ELL students and is closely linked to the first goal of bilingual education; English language proficiency. All ELL students must, by law, receive ELD instruction in addition to the core curriculum.

ELD is a part of the daily program for every ELL student at Imagine Hope Community Charter School. It is neither relegated to a nonspecific exposure to the English language through activities with English only students (i.e., during Physical 2 Education, Music and Art etc.) nor is it the only instruction ELL students receive. It is a vital, planned, specific component of the total education.

To maximize comprehension, retention and speed in acquiring English language proficiency, research shows that ELD must be taught in real-life settings where the language is used in context and the atmosphere of the classroom is free of anxiety. Thematic instruction connects the ELD curriculum, which can be student or teachergenerated. Examples of thematic instruction concepts are: safety, personal information, ecology, immigration, etc. A short unit on dinosaurs or apples does not constitute thematic instruction. Themes can move from concrete to abstract as students build background knowledge and vocabulary. The curriculum standards for Imagine Hope Community Charter School English Language Development include the thematic instruction units that are recommended for each level of English language acquisition.

ELL students come to Imagine Hope Community Charter School from a variety of backgrounds, primary languages and levels of English language proficiency.

The ELD program used at Imagine Hope Community Charter School is the Pullout/Push-in classroom model. In this model the ELL teacher either takes EL students to another classroom within the school or comes into the general education classroom to provide instruction. Planning occurs between the ELL teacher and the general education teacher. This includes scheduling, teaching activities/strategies, parallel themes, linguistic and academic assessments, and reporting to parents.